Hyundai Veloster

Hyundai Veloster at Tint Magic Window Tint

Hyundai Veloster at Tint Magic Window Tint

Hyundai Veloster at Tint Magic Window Tint. We are located at 11344 Wiles Road, Coral Springs, Fl 33076. Call us for a free estimate! (954)840-7883.

The Veloster is a pseudo hot-hatch—its quirky styling stands out in traffic—yet its racy looks deceive. The base engine is a feeble 132-hp 1.6-liter four with a standard six-speed manual; a dual-clutch six-speed automatic is optional. The Turbo boasts 201 hp and a six-speed manual; a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic is optional. Handling is predictable and lively, yet steering feel is vague. If a funky-looking hatchback is all you want, step right up, but enthusiasts will be disappointed.

It has been three years since Hyundai added the turbocharged version of  the Veloster hatchback and four since the Veloster originally went on sale. Perhaps because of its bizarre, asymmetric door layout—a single large portal for the driver, two smaller apertures on the passenger side serving front and rear seats—the Veloster’s exterior styling still feels fresh. Now, late in the model’s life, Hyundai has taken the 201-hp Turbo and crafted the Rally Edition to mine its rally-racing participation for some added spice.

Hyundai also took care to position the Rally Edition within spitting distance of the rest of the Veloster lineup. Based on the Turbo R-Spec, the least-expensive turbocharged Veloster, the Rally Edition is $2350 dearer. Curiously, the Rally Edition is also pricier than the stick-shift Veloster Turbo, by $1350, but goes without that model’s leather seat upholstery, heated front chairs, push-button ignition, and electroluminescent gauge cluster. The Rally Edition does come with the Turbo’s eight-speaker, 450-watt Dimension audio system, however, as well as a special blue-and-black interior color scheme, Rally Edition floor mats, and a Rally Edition badge.

The sport suspension reins in body roll slightly compared to regular Veloster Turbos, but the biggest improvement actually is in ride quality. While certainly firmer, the stiffer springs and shocks work better in concert than the components on other Velosters. As with those cars, chassis flex is still an issue—the car’s platform is among the oldest in Hyundai’s current lineup, dating back to the previous-generation Elantra—and the steering is simply there, returning little feedback and a syrupy off-center behavior that isn’t very sporty. Push too hard, and the Rally Edition understeers dutifully until you back off.

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