Ford Mustang

Ford Mustang Racing Stripes at Tint Magic Window Tinting

Ford Mustang Racing Stripes at Tint Magic Window Tint

Ford Mustang Racing Stripes at Tint Magic Window Tint. Call us for a free estimate! (954)840-7883.

The galloping pony nestled in the grille serves as a reminder that the Mustang is most at home on the open road. Both the coupe and convertible come with your choice of a 300-hp 3.7-liter V-6, a 310-hp 2.3-liter turbo four-cylinder, or a 435-hp 5.0-liter V-8; choose from a six-speed manual or a six-speed automatic. The rear-wheel-drive chassis is eager to attack corners while enabling a smooth ride when cruising. The manual’s stiff clutch makes it a bit of a chore to drive in heavy traffic.

For the Mustang’s 50th year in service, Ford went back to the drawing board, we think with the distinct goal of eliminating the stigma of the non-V8 Mustang. While the V6 is still being offered (your local Avis and Enterprise lots wouldn’t be the same without them), it’s best to think of the new, four-cylinder, turbocharged Mustang EcoBoost as the entry-level model.

Like the V6 before it, certain boxes are correctly ticked. Dual exhausts? Check. 18-inch alloys? Check. (Our EcoBoost Premium model even shares its wheels with the base GT). HID headlamps? Check. Up front, there’s a surprisingly meaty chin spoiler while the muscular lines of the ‘Stang’s long hood tie in nicely with the fastback shape, which terminates in a neat rear spoiler. There’s even a body-colored diffuser at the back, between the chromed exhaust tips. The bottom line is, unless you’re a true Mustang aficionado, you’ll be hard pressed to tell the difference between the turbocharged car and its 435-horsepower brother.

Simply sitting in the redesigned cabin isn’t enough to give the EcoBoost away, either. The leather-trimmed seats (standard on the Premium trim) are cozy and supportive, with plenty of bolstering to help keep both driver and passenger in place while the ‘Stang exhibits its newly enhanced cornering abilities. For the first time in recent memory, dropping $1,595 for the optional Recaro seats is no longer a no-brainer, as we found these seats quite pleasing as the miles and Gs piled on.

Ford Focus window tinting at Tint Magic Coral Springs

Ford Focus Window Tinting

Ford Focus Window Tinting at Tint Magic

Ford Focus window tinting at Tint Magic Coral Springs, we are serving Tamarac, Sunrise,Weston,Parkland, Coconut Creek and  Margate. Call us  for a free estimate! 954-840-7883

Now that the 2015 Ford Focus ST benefits from a head-to-toe refresh, we’re reminded just how much fun it is to drive this larger fast Ford.
The 2015 Ford Focus Line was “very expensive,” admits Ford Focus marketing manager Omar Odeh, as it involved more than just some new badges and wheels. Like all versions of the Focus, the 2015 ST benefits from a completely new nose, a restyled liftgate, a redesigned interior, extra sound deadening, and even slight suspension tweaks. Visually, the new Focus looks more expensive and more mature, especially in the subdued Magnetic gray paint of our tester. (Red-painted brake calipers are a nice highlight.) Whereas the original Focus ST was way over-the-top boy-racer, your average car shopper might not immediately discern that the refreshed ST is more than just a humble Focus SE.
We’re most pleased with the new cabin, as the 2015 Ford Focus ST becomes a more user-friendly and high-quality place to spend time. Several small changes make the ST’s interior less rental car and more Euro-hatch: aluminum trim for the vents, smarter and more usable climate-control switches, and moving the parking brake adjacent to the driver’s hip rather than on the far side of the center stack. The improved sound insulation is immediately noticeable on the highway, where the Focus ST keeps wind and tire noise at bay, making the car feel more expensive than in prior model years. Ford’s hot hatch comes closer than ever to matching the civility and refinement of the Volkswagen Golf GTI.

Ford F150 lights -Tint Magic Window Tinting

Ford F150 at Tint Magic Coral Springs

Ford F150 at Tint Magic Coral Springs

Tint Magic Coral Springs likes to work together with the customer to give them the best solution that fit his budget and expectations .After to apply window tinting on his windows, our customer was looking for an update on Ford F150 lights and we gave him some options and this is the result. It looks great! If you have in mind any project just tell us and we will work together to make it happen.

About Ford F150:

The legendary F-150—now with an aluminum bed and body—remains the hard-working pickup it’s always been. The base 3.5-liter V-6 makes 253 lb-ft; a 2.7-liter turbo V-6 (375 lb-ft) and 5.0-liter V-8 (387 lb-ft) are available, too, but the optional 3.5-liter turbo V-6 (420 lb-ft) is best for towing, boasting a maximum capacity of 12,200 pounds. All engines have a six-speed automatic. Regular cab, SuperCab and SuperCrew bodies as well as 5.5-, 6.5-, or 8-ft beds make the F-150 fit many needs.

The full-size pickup truck and the V-8 engine were supposed to be inseparable, like the internet and cat videos. You can’t have one without the other—or so we thought.

In America’s most popular vehicle, the Ford F150, two turbocharged six-cylinder engines marketed under the EcoBoost name have dethroned the naturally aspirated V-8. Ford’s new 2.7-liter twin-turbo V-6 is the popular choice, while the 3.5-liter twin-turbo V-6 is the top performer. The larger six allows for greater hauling capacity, accelerates the truck more quickly, and swills less gas in EPA testing than the V-8 alternative. It’s enough to make even old-school truck buyers acknowledge that there actually is a replacement for displacement.

Ford Mustang Shelby

ford mustang shelby

Ford Mustang Shelby

Ford’s newest pony car on steroids, the Shelby GT350, is more than just a quarter-mile monster. Yes, the 5.2-liter V-8 can hustle it down the straight at a brain-melting pace. It’s not the 526 hp, the 429 lb-ft of torque, or the 4.3-second zero-to-60-mph run that has us drooling; it’s that Ford has finally built a muscle car that can hold its own through corners. True speed freaks can opt for the GT350R, which loses the rear seat, adds carbon fiber, and cuts 0.4 second off the zero-to-60 time.

Mustang lovers got sweaty, but as usual, the rest of the auto world just shrugged and moved on with evolution.

Ford says it’s different this time. It says thenew Shelby G350,  is a light-year leap in sophistication and handling. It says the flat-plane-crank V-8 delivers 8000 revelations per minute, that the magnetic suspension and custom, cross-drilled brake system and Michelin superstick tires prove that the company is serious about achieving world-class handling.

Well, Ford says a lot of things.

With the six-speed slotted into gear and the surprisingly light clutch lifted, the GT350 leapt onto the asphalt of Monterey’s Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca. First corner and first impressions: tight, tied-down, stable, maybe a little bit of push but, hey, the car’s cold and a bit heavy. Wind it out—wait, where’s the redline? Nowhere. It doesn’t exist! The sucker just keeps straining, keeps revving, keeps swelling with a glorious brassy, unmuffled, rhapsodic roar.

The anticipated upshift was forgotten as another corner approached.

The brakes—oof, such brakes!—chomp down, but the nose doesn’t dive. The car isn’t crossed up or squirming, it’s flat and stable and ready to turn right now! Less understeer this time, a perfect arc scribed from the white line to apex to white line. And it’s on the gas again, the sound flooding back—that addictive, dazzling, erotic exhale of lyric fire.

Yes. Yes, indeed. Ford is serious.

Ford F150 2016

Ford F150 2016

Ford F150

Ford positioning its puny 3.5-liter twin-turbo EcoBoost V-6 atop the F-series lineup caused more than a few observers to choke on their chew. To see how the power structure shakes out, we lined up two nearly identical F-150s: one with the 5.0-liter V-8, one with the 3.5-liter twin-turbo EcoBoost V-6. Both are four-wheel-drive crew cabs with 5.5-foot beds. They pack the same six-speed automatic and 3.55:1 final-drive ratio. Aside from the turbocharged truck’s option to display a digital boost gauge, the interiors are indistinguishable. Even the paints are similar shades, just in case UV saturation affects weight. The EcoBoost F-150 did, however, come in 213 pounds heavier, in part due to its dual-pane sunroof and the FX4 package’s skidplates.

 The powertrains are closely matched. The 5.0-liter makes 385 horsepower at 5750 rpm; the EcoBoost, 365 at 5000. But the V-6 has a big lead in torque, 420 pound-feet to 387, and it peaks 1350 revs lower than the V-8, at 2500 rpm. We took our pair to the test track and, after the regular procedure was complete, hooked a pair of identically loaded 6400-pound trailers to the hitches for extra acceleration and fuel-economy tests. And with that, deciding a finishing order got a little complicated.

Unladen, the 5.0 trails the EcoBoost to 60 mph by a half-second, taking 6.3 seconds versus 5.8. With trailers in tow, that gap grows to nearly two full seconds. From behind the wheel, the difference is astounding. Not that this should come as a surprise: Ford rates the EcoBoost’s towing capacity higher than the V-8’s, and our four-wheel-drive V-6 is rated to pull 11,500 pounds to the V-8’s 9000. (We chose less than the maximum load to represent what these trucks are more likely to encounter in everyday use.)

Still, such a significant load shines an unforgiving light on power­train weaknesses. Laden, the V-8 needs a lot more pedal travel and a lot more revs than the EcoBoost does. From cruising speed, if you roll into the V-8’s throttle, you just keep on rolling in deeper and deeper until the throttle is wide open, waiting for a few more mph. With more than three tons out back, even moderate acceleration calls for full throttle or nothing. Under partial throttle, the turbocharged six gets things done that the V-8 can’t.