Tesla Model3

Tesla Model 3 at Tint Magic Window Tinting Coral Springs

Tesla Model 3 at Tint Magic Window Tinting Coral Springs

Tesla Model 3 at Tint Magic window Tinting Coral Springs

Tesla Model 3 at Tint Magic Window Tinting Coral Springs

Tesla Model 3 Window Tint at Tint Magic Window Tinting Coral Springs. We are located at 11344 Wiles Road Coral Springs Fl 33076. Call us for a free estimate! (954)840-7883.

Tesla Model 3:

The Model 3 is supposed to be Tesla’s eco-friendly gift to the motoring masses; so far, however, it’s not possible to get a version that comes close to the promised price of $36,000. Currently the least expensive version, the Mid Range model with rear-wheel drive, starts at $47,200; the all-wheel-drive Model 3 Long Range starts at $54,200, and the performance version starts at $65,200—not our idea of affordable. According to the EPA, the Model 3 in all-wheel-drive or Performance guise can go 310 miles before you have to plug it in to recharge its batteries. Tesla says the Mid Range model has 260 miles of range. The long-range version of the Model 3 with rear-wheel drive went from zero to 60 mph in 5.1 seconds. It delivers this performance in an almost silent whoosh. The steering feels great, and the ride is firm without being harsh.

A large 15.0-inch touchscreen controls almost every feature, ranging from the adjustment of the sideview mirrors to the infotainment system. The downside of this design, however, is that it can be annoying—and distracting—when you need to do something simple, such as changing the radio station or adjusting the interior’s temperature.

Interior Storage and Features:

The Model 3’s stowage spaces are especially impressive, with large bins and cubbies located throughout the cabin. The front seats are supportive and comfortable. However, despite offering plenty of space, the rear seat is rather uncomfortable due to a total lack of under-thigh support and a low seat-bottom cushion that pushes the knees of rear seat passengers into their chests. Tesla offers a decent number of active-safety features as standard, but more advanced systems such as adaptive cruise control and lane-keeping assist are included only in Enhanced Autopilot package. So far, Tesla hasn’t been able to produce vehicles quickly enough to meet demand. Expect to wait should you wish to join the ranks of Tesla owners.

Tesla Model X

Tesla-Model-X

Tesla Model X

Tesla Model X

Tesla Model X

It’s been a long time coming, but it’s finally here. It’s the Tesla Model X, the slightly taller, somewhat more practical follow-up to the Model S. It could have been little more than that — Tesla could have simply given the S a bit of a vertical stretch and called it a day, but the company instead decided to do something a little bit… different, to give the X a signature design element that would set it apart from its fraternal twin.

I am of course referring to the pair of “falcon-wing” doors that provide access to the rear seats, craning skyward at the touch of a button. Iconic statement that will earn this car a place in the history of great designs? Or, misguided case of form trumping function? And, just what’s the Model X like to drive compared to the generally excellent Model S? Let’s find out.

The idea was a natural one: slightly expand upon the Model S and turn it into the sort of rig perfect for Monday-morning dashes to school or Friday-afternoon cruises to Aspen. As such, the Model X is bigger, offering more than twice the cargo space of the S if you forgo the third row of seats. But you probably shouldn’t, because unlike the novelty way-back area on the Model S, third row seats face forward on the Model X.

As such they become genuinely useful, with enough headroom and legroom (just) for a grown adult such as myself to squeeze back there. Second-row seats, meanwhile, have acres of room, while the heated and air-conditioned thrones up front for driver and passenger not only offer the perfect temperature regardless of weather, but deliver a decent amount of support and good comfort, too.

In fact, spring for the $1,000 “Subzero” package and all of the seats in the Model X can be heated at the touch of the button, even the middle one in the second row. This is a nice way to pamper your passengers — or surprise them with a warm bottom if you’re the practical joking type.

What hasn’t changed is the massive, 17-inch LCD in the center of the car’s dashboard, something carried over from the Model S. It’s still powered by the same Tegra 3 processor, which delivers reasonably clean visuals but struggles at times to keep up with your finger presses. Bring on Tegra X1, please.

That display will split opinions, just like it did years ago when we first saw it on the S. I personally love the size, but not the glare, and I dearly wish it had support for Android Auto and Apple’s CarPlay. Regardless, integrated LTE connectivity certainly is nice, making it easy to monitor your car’s charging status from anywhere via Tesla’s smartphone app, an app that offers some other pretty compelling features, too.